Part-Time study: the new paradigm for Higher Education?



Publications

Part-Time study: the new paradigm for Higher Education?
A selection of papers presented at the 2011 Conference of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning

Edited by: Bill Jones and Susan Oosthuizen

CD-ROM
UALL 2012
Price £10 - orders to Lucy Bate, Administrator, 21 De Montfort Street, Leicester, LE1 7GE. Email: admin@uall.ac.uk
telephone: 0116 285 9702

The papers in this selection began as presentations to the Annual Conference of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning (UALL) held at Stirling University in March 2011. The Conference theme was Part-time: the new paradigm for higher education? UALL is an association primarily of practice, policy and research, and has published conference proceedings and an extensive list of research papers. These were not only intended to disseminate the research work of members, but also to include both established researchers and those in the early stages of academic research careers. This contributes to an important UALL aim - to support new entrants to the profession of higher education lifelong learning.

Part time is ‘different’ and yet ‘part-time’ also represents nearly half of all students in higher education. Increasingly it is also said that there is no such thing as a ‘full-time’ student, or at least very few individuals who genuinely can afford to study without any part-time work. And yet part time is different – or distinctive – in a number of ways all of which originate from the facts that part-time students are not following a predicted path through initial education, have other major demands on their time (work, family) and are more likely to come from sections of the population who can be categorised as ‘non traditional’. In other ways part-time students have common aims with traditional undergraduates in terms of career, or ‘graduateness’. It is the range of aspiration, experience and outcome for this very diverse constituency of learner that this publication seeks to examine.

 

Contents

Chapter 1.  Rethinking graduate attributes: understanding the learning journeys of part-time students in the Open University in Scotland
Martha Caddell and Pete Cannell

Chapter 2.  Fostering a transactional presence: a practical guide to supporting work-based learners
Frances Marsden and Andrew Youde

Chapter 3.  A lasting legacy: higher education and work-based learning in the ‘early years’ context 
Samantha McMahon

Chapter 4. From college to university: exploring the part-time student experience
Joan Thomson and Ronald Macintyre

Chapter 5. Universities facing up to the challenges: a case study of community expertise in part-time provision
Kelly McCarthy and Mark Richardson

Chapter 6.  Exploring aspects of demand for part-time study
Bernadette Sanderson

Chapter 7.  Can two negatives now make a positive? Investigating the ‘deficit models’ of ‘part-time’ and ‘work-based’ as key learning options for the future 
Ruth Helyer and Helen Corkill 

Chapter 8.  Opening up universities: a comparative study of barriers to lifelong learning in Germany and England 
Liz Marr, Sonja Moissidis and Morag Harvey

Chapter 9.  The Foundation Degree: students’ bitter-sweet struggle to achieve a work/study balance
Jeanette Davies

Chapter 10.  Learning to engage. Organisational strategy and learning: a case study in supporting part-time learners employed in the food industry
Val Braybrooks

Chapter 11.  The new paradigm? Part-time study in action
Lynne Jenkins, Colin Trotman, Bernard Salter, Vanessa Thomas and Joanna Ward

 

Contributors  

 

Bill Jones, Honorary Professor of Lifelong Learning, University of Leicester

Susan Oosthuizen, University Senior Lecturer in Historic Environment, Institute of Continuing Education, University of Cambridge

 

Martha Caddell Learning and Teaching Coordinator (Enhancement and Employability), The Open University in Scotland

Pete Cannell Depute Director (Learning, Teaching and Curriculum) at the Open University in Scotland

 

Frances Marsden, Course Leader, foundation degree in Educational Management and Administration, University of Huddersfield

Andrew Youde, Head of Division of Academic and Professional Studies, University of Huddersfield

 

Samantha McMahon Principal Lecturer, University of Huddersfield,  Course Leader Fd/BA (Hons) Early Years

 

Joan Thomson, Learning & Teaching Co-ordinator, The Open University in Scotland

Ronald Macintyre,  Learning and Teaching Co-ordinator, The Open University in Scotland

 

Kelly McCarthy, Tutor (Wellbeing) Development Officer, University of Wales, Newport

Mark Richardson Curriculum/ Tutor Development Officer, University of Wales, Newport

 

Bernadette Sanderson, Director – West of Scotland Wider Access Forum, University of the West of Scotland

 

Ruth Helyer, Head of Workforce Development (Research and Policy), Teesside University

Helen Corkill, University Co-ordinator for Part-time Provision, University of Bedfordshire

 

Jeannette Davies   City of Sunderland College

 

Liz Marr, Director, Centre for Inclusion and Curriculum, Open University, UK

Sonia Moissidis, Project Manager: Opull, University of Leuphana at Luneberg. Germany

Morag Harvey, Centre Manager: Curriculum Projects, Centre for Inclusion and Curriculum, Open University, UK

 

Val Braybrooks, Dean and Director of the National Centre for Food Manufacturing, The University of Lincoln

 

Lynne Jenkins, Part-time Degree Manager, Department of Adult Continuing Education, Swansea University

Colin Trotman Director and Head of the Department of Adult Continuing Education, Swansea University

Bernard Salter Curriculum Development Manager, Department of Adult Continuing Education, Swansea University

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