Widening Participation and Access Network

Purpose
The Widening Participation and Access Network provides a forum for exploring policy and practice relating to those least likely to think of returning to education. Many national and local policies overlook the specific needs of adults, particularly those from under-represented groups. The Network gives members the chance to discuss recent research and scrutinize policy, enabling us to formulate individual and joint responses to the changing context. The Network also offers the opportunity for members to share examples of innovative practice that open up educational opportunities for all.

Membership
Those working in Higher or Further Education who are responsible for or working within: widening participation, equality and diversity, admissions, teaching and learning.

For further information about this Network and the Joint Seminar Series, please contact the Network Convenor: Annette Hayton

JOINT SEMINAR SERIES

The Widening Participation and Access Network with SRHE Access and Widening Participation Network is organising a series of seminars:

Researching the Micro and Local in Widening Participation Practice

The aim of this series is to ground and contextualise discussions of widening participation, which can often be spoken of in largely abstract terms, in considerations of the local and micro practices of WP by focusing on two large and complex cities (Sheffield and London) and on Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland which face different challenges in relation to WP and to the idea of the ‘local’. The seminars will use WP and access-related research to draw attention to how WP practices at a local level shape and influence choice-making, access, progression and success and how, in turn, these inform issues of in/justice and in/equality.

The series will bring researchers and other academics together with practitioners from HE, FE, schools and local authorities departments to explore, amongst other areas:

•        how ‘local’ is conceptualised and researched and how this shapes thinking and practice

•        how connections are made across cities and regions and the strategies adopted to try and connect the local with the national

•        the micro practices of WP and how these shape and are shaped by macro (national) and the meso (institutional) policies and practice

•        what lessons can be learned for researching WP across cities or regions

This is a joint seminar series between the Society for Research into Higher Education, delivered as part of the Access and Widening Participation Network (conveners: Penny-Jane Burke and Jacqueline Stevenson) and the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning Widening Participation and Access Network (convener Annette Hayton).  Support is also being given by Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Sheffield.

Seminar 1: January 22nd, The meaning and complexity of the ‘local’, SRHE, London

Seminar 2:  February 24th: From the national to the local: the view from a city, Sheffield University

Seminar 3: 8 April, From the national to the local: the contribution of knowledge and the curriculum in widening access, Sheffield Hallam University

Seminar 4: Wales with UALL Cymru – 15 June Cardiff University

SESSION 5: UALL NETWORK CONFERENCE 13 JULY LONDON

Seminar 6: TBC - Scotland

Seminar 7: TBC Northern Ireland

 

 

Seminar 1: January 22nd, The meaning and complexity of the ‘local’, SRHE, London

This session will explore how landscape of higher education has changed post-Dearing and the implication for access and participation in a new and changing climate of 'micro-landscapes'. The presenters will ask critical questions about who has access to what, and where, with a particular focus on the micro-landscape of London  and explore the micro practices of WP and how these shape and are shaped by macro and the meso policies and practice

10.00

Registration and refreshments

10.30

Introductions and overview of the series and session

Professor Jacqueline Stevenson, Sheffield Hallam University;  Professor Penny-Jane Burke, University of Newcastle Australia and Roehampton University; Annette Hayton, University of Bath

10.45

Still Searching for Rita? Reflections on Widening Participation Research and Practice Post Dearing.

Dr David Thompson, Institute of Education. University of Wolverhampton.

12.00

Focussing on the local: Progression to higher education in London.

Dr Graeme Atherton, Head of AccessHE and Director of NEON (National Education Opportunities in Education)

1.00

Lunch

1.45

Widening participation: who, what, how and where. Linking London a case study in practice.

Sue Betts,  Director, Linking London

2.45

Break

3.00

Critical conversations: in this session delegates will explore key questions posed by the contributors, and share their own research and practice perspectives before posing questions back to the panel

4.00

Plenary and panel discussion

4.30

Close

 

 

Seminar 2:  February 24th: From the national to the local: the view from a city

The Studio, Sheffield Students Union, Sheffield University

This session will explore crucial elements of widening participation interventions by exploring the relationships between the school sector and higher education institutions. Two papers and one case study will be used to present different facets of this relationship at the national and local levels. The first part of the day examines the use of contextual data at the national level, and the practices and strategies of widening participation at the local level, contrasting London with other UK cities. The second part of the day brings together a local sixth form college manager and an HE outreach professional for a discussion of the challenges of collaborating across this sector divide.

10.00

Registration and refreshments

10.30

Introductions and overview of the series and the session

Rita Hordosy, University of Sheffield

10.45

Does the use of contextual data help or hinder widening participation?

Professor Stephen Gorard, Durham University

12.00

London-centric widening participation? The capital’s machinery of widening participation and why it can’t simply be transplanted to provincial cities

Sol Gamsu, King’s College London.

1.00

Lunch

1.45

Managing Outreach Relationships between HE and Schools: A Sheffield Case Study

Alison McKenzie, University of Sheffield and schools patners

2.45

Break

3.00

Critical conversations: in this session delegates will explore key questions posed by the contributors, and share their own research and practice perspectives before posing questions back to the panel

4.00

Plenary and panel discussion

4.30

Close

 

Seminar 3: 8 April, From the national to the local: the contribution of knowledge and the curriculum in widening access, Sheffield Hallam University,Stoddart 7138

This session will ask critical questions of knowledge and the curriculum. The first part of the day will locate considerations of inequalities in relation to students' success and the relationship between national and institutional policies, curriculum, and powerful knowledge. In the second part of the day we will focus on how the City of Sheffield is seeking to enable greater access through considerations of academic preparedness and academic choice making.

9.30

Registration and refreshments

10.00

Introductions and overview of the series and the session

Professor Jacqueline Stevenson, Sheffield Hallam University

10.15

Differential outcomes from HE.

Dr Anna Mountford-Zimdars, Senior Lecturer in Higher Education, King's Learning Institute, Kings College London

11.00

System diversity, inequality and epistemic access.

Professor Sue Clegg, Emeritus Professor of Higher Education Research, Leeds Metropolitan University

11.45

Short break

12.00

Making successful choices: the view from Sheffield

Jackie Powell, Higher Education Progression Partnership (HEPP)

12.45

Questions to the morning speakers                            

1.15

Lunch 

2.15

HEPP: a case study of collaboration in higher education - how and why it works in Sheffield.

Jackie Powell, Higher Education Progression Partnership; Carol Castle, Sheffield Hallam University;  James Busson, University of Sheffield   

2.45

Break

3.00

Critical conversations: in this session delegates will explore key questions posed by the contributors, and share their own research and practice perspectives before posing questions back to the panel

4.00

Plenary and panel discussion

4.30

Close